small feet journal

 

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Help us to help the wildlife we care for by donating here. Click on the button below. Just one sachet of cat food feeds a baby hedgehog for a day

newsletter

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volunteers

We are run totally by volunteers. Our volunteers are dedicated and come from a wide range of backgrounds and all bring something special to our team. Volunteers

 

 

save mebrians

ABOUT US

 

 

We are a Small Wildlife Charity that this year will respond to over 1600 wildlife rescues. Each year this number increases along with our costs. We care, treat, and rehabilitate all of our British wildlife.

 

We originally started supporting local vets and now receive wildlife from the public . We are available seven days a week for advice and admissions. We are sometimes able to collect and rescue wildlife in a variety of unusual situations READ MORE

 

education

 

As well as working on the front line we give talks and show our stunning wildlife to a variety of groups and schools - Wildlife Rocks Me Talks. We believe that a better understanding of these creatures will promote not only tolerance but a willingness to integrate them into our lives.

 

Children will become the custodians of our planet and we hope, through our talks, will have a better understanding of and take an interest in our wonderful wildlife as they take on that ultimate role.

 

We raise funds by donations, our newsletter, attending County Shows, Car boot sales, selling on eBay, Fairs, and our shop.

 

There are many ways you can help us

 

See if you can help us by clicking here - Can You Help Us . From hands on volunteering to clicking at home we need all sorts of help and all sorts of people to join our small and crazy team.

 

How we started

 

Whilst out walking with my dog in the early 1980's I found a small hedgehog stuck in a fence. He was too fat to go through and his prickles wouldn't let him go back.


He had been pushing so long in an attempt to free himself that the wire had cut into his body and his leg was bleeding where he had pushed and pushed against the ground. I had in my handbag a pair of pliers (no surprise to anyone who knows me) I cut the wire and removed the hedgehog READ MORE

 

 

 

CUBBING

 

Early in the morning a Hunt of mounted riders quietly surround a thicket they know to contain a family of foxes. The female fox or vixen hears the movement but will not leave her cover as she has cubs to protect. The huntsmen surrounds the thicket, they slap their saddles, hollar and shout to prevent the fox and her cubs leaving the thicket. They want to have their fun.
The hounds are sent in and the vixen comes out to protect her cubs, she Young fox cubs do not have the skills and knowledge of their parents, they are playful and trusting and unlikely to flee danger. Their inquisitive nature ensures they investigate anything new.

Autumn Hunting refers to the period formerly known as "cubbing". Traditionally this was the time when the new entry of hounds learnt how to hunt their quarry. Meets were held early in the morning and the field were present to help "hold up" covert (i.e. prevent a fox from leaving the area). The dress code is different from formal hunting dress and is often referred to as "ratcatcher", "Ratcatcher" refers to the tweed jackets that are worn READ MORE

 

 

fox in a garden

Foxes are extremely clever and adaptable animals and have taken well to towns. The urban fox has evolved so well he seems really at home in our towns now.

 

As a rescue we get both town and country foxes and they are almost different breeds.


 

Foxes get used to their surrounding and recognise people and noises very quickly. This can make them very cheeky. Cubs have far less reserve than their parents and will come right up to people, cats and dogs unaware of the dangers this often causes them. By the time a fox has reached the end of their first year they have learnt to respect all of them and should keep a safe distance away. That distance in the countryside is greater as they are just like humans, the need for personal space varies from countryside to city READ MORE

remember the bear hug code

If as a human you were captured by a bear and taken to his cave and told in bear language that he was going to make you better you would not relax and many of us would die of shock. Animals are not cuddled in the wild and the only time another species touches them is when they are going to eat them.

 

Wildlife Rescue for mammals

All our wildlife is scared of us and shock kills. If you find an injured animal place it in a warm strong box so it canot escape and maybe covered in a towel so it can hide and get it to your nearest rescue. Looking at the animals and talking to them will not help.

 

READ MORE

Wildlife Rescue Care for Birds

 

Many baby birds that sound in distress are perfectly health and very strong. Once temporarily abandoned by their parents in a bid to encourage their independence, the struggling youngster can become very distressed.
Usually protective parent stay very nearby to feed in an emergency and see them safely on their way. At this point a well-meaning human mistakes their cry and decides to rescue the chirpy fledgling.

 

READ MORE

 

education

 

As well as working on the front line we give talks and show our stunning wildlife to a variety of groups and schools - Wildlife Rocks Me Talks. We believe that a better understanding of these creatures will promote not only tolerance but a willingness to integrate them into our lives.

 

Children will become the custodians of our planet and we hope, through our talks, will have a better understanding of and take an interest in our wonderful wildlife as they take on that ultimate role.

 

We raise funds by donations, our newsletter, attending County Shows, Car boot sales, selling on eBay, Fairs, and our shop.

who's up & about ,who's safe & who's warm in bed

january

stoat rehabilitation

FOX

The vixen will start to prepare several earth prior to giving birth. It could be under a garden shed, disused rabbit warrens, badger setts or self built.

 

BADGER

Female badgers are pregnant. Badger activity is irregular this month. Badgers can stay underground for several days in cold weather.

 

HEDGEHOG

Most hedgehogs will be hibernating, but some do wake and venture out from their nest looking for food and water.

 

 

 

 

february

stoat rescueFOX

In February the vixen will be spending time in the earth she has prepared for birth.

 

BADGER

This is the peak time for cub births. It is also the height of the badger’s mating season.

 

HEDGEHOG

Most are in deep hibernation in their winter nests, dry and hidden deep in wood piles, compost heaps and under sheds.

 

 

march

 

marchFOX

March is the peak of the cub season. The average litter of cubs is usually five in number and when born they are blind and deaf. Since being unable to regulate their own body heat, the vixen will not usually leave their side for about 10-14 days.

 

BADGER

Badgers are now very active. At the sett much bedding collection takes place. Badgers have amazing control over their reproduction via a process called delayed implantation. The badgers can mate at any time of year and yet seem to give birth in February

 

HEDGEHOG

The first Spring sun begins to bring some hedgehogs out of hibernation. Those who successfully hibernated will be thin and very hungry. Spring matings occur this month, a lot of snuffling and grunting.

 

april

weasle recsue

FOX

The cubs come out for the first time above ground. After playing they will often crash down in a pile and go to sleep out in the open. Play is how cubs learn and the pecking order is established this will be essential later in the litter’s and adult life.

 

BADGER

Cubs are now exploring their setts right up to the entrance holes. Many will emerge for the first time this month.

 

HEDGEHOG

Copious matings occurs during this month. Birth sites can include flower beds, underneath hedges, underneath sheds, in unused rabbit burrows, in compost heaps and even in bags of rubbish. The pregnant mother makes a nest of dry leaves, moss and anything else suitable. Litters of babies are 2 – 8 in number. The average number is 4 or 5 babies.

 


dormouse rescue

MAY

FOX

To wean the cubs off her milk the vixen will lay away from them during the day, bringing small items of food back for them.

BADGER

Badger cubs are now exploring the areas around their setts, making May a good month to start badger watching.

HEDGEHOG

Probably one of the times of year you are most likely to hear mating occurring in your garden. A lot of hoglets are born during this late Spring/early Summer period.

 

july

JUNE


FOX

June is possibly the best month of the year to observe fox cubs at play and it’s usually in this month that the vixen will leave them in an area whilst she goes out hunting. Now completely weaned off their mother’s milk, it will be the food she supplies that the cubs are reliant upon.

 

BADGER

Most cubs should be weaned by the end of this month. However in dry weather mothers may suckle their cubs for longer. Badgers will emerge in daylight in undisturbed areas.

 

HEDGEHOG

Still probably one of the times of year you are most likely to hear mating occurring in your garden. Lots of young hoglets out and about and still more are being born.

 

 

dormouse rescue

 

JULY

FOX

The cubs are becoming more self-sufficient which may be due to the fact that the adults will bring back less food. Both dog fox and vixen will take the cubs out to known feeding sites. Often the cubs will be spilt, e.g. 3 with the dog fox and 2 with the vixen

 

BADGER

Cubs are now around half the weight of an adult badger and are finding food for themselves.

 

HEDGEHOG

Lots of young hoglets out and about with still more being born.

 

 


dormouse rehabilitation

 

AUGUST

 

FOX

Looking more like adults now, the cubs will start their activities around the same time as the adults mostly active between dusk and dawn. Fruit plays an important part in the foxes’ natural diet.

 

BADGER

Badgers do a lot of digging at their setts this month. If earthworms are scarce badgers will take other foods such as cereals and fruits.

 

HEDGEHOG

Lots of young hoglets out and about and still more being born.

 

september

SEPTEMBER

FOX
The fox cubs are now almost full-grown and look like adults. Fruit will be still high on the foxes’ diet and the sub adults will now start to forage alone.


BADGER
This month many badgers will be gathering bedding material and taking it down into their setts. This is part of their preparations for winter.


HEDGEHOG
Hoglets born at this time may or may not be large enough to survive the Winter, they will eat constantly to reach the required weight of 750g.

 

otter rescue

 

OCTOBER

FOX
More people see a fox for the first time in this month. Many of the foxes born this year will die under the wheels of a car for they are crossing unfamiliar terrain. On warm wet nights the foxes will spend a lot of their time hunting earthworms and fruit.


BADGER
Feeding is the main priority for badgers this month as badgers need to put on fat to see them through the Winter. Fortunately there are now lots of fruits for badgers to eat.


HEDGEHOG
Those fit enough begin to build their “hiberriculum” (a large nest made from dry leaves, moss and grass) at this time. By late October the onset of early frosts indicates those first hedgehogs that start to hibernate.

 

dormouse center

 

NOVEMBER

 

FOX
The vixen will start to investigate earths in preparation for the New Year. Often she will select two or three earths. Although a lot of noisy encounters can be heard and it will still be possible to observe the young foxes playing. Foxes will start to forage in quiet areas early evening.


BADGER
Badger activity levels gradually decline during November. The badgers start coming out later and there is very little mating activity.


HEDGEHOG
Bonfire Night please check for sleeping hedgehogs and preferably move the bonfire a day before lighting to disturb any sleepy hogs. Those huge piles of wood and sticks make very inviting places as do compost heaps. By now, many hedgehogs will be already hibernating, whilst some are still quite active and preparing for hibernation.

 

 

otter center

 

DECEMBER

 

FOX
With the mating season approaching foxes will now be actively defending their territories. The territory borders are now showing increasing evidence of fox activity and the musky smell of foxes is evident.


BADGER
Badgers may spend a lot of time sleeping in their setts this month. Because of this, few badgers are killed by road traffic. The fertilised eggs of female badgers now implant in the uterus and start developing.


HEDGEHOG
Still some pre-hibernating hedgehogs venture about searching for food.